18

Insofar as artistic research takes place within rich fabrics of practice, it is always also embedded in a multiplicity of languages – both verbal and non-verbal ones. Requiring submissions in English is – in some aspects – like asking for text as the only mode in which to report on an artistic research project: fixed formats that restrict options of articulation.

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50 Billion Micrograms. In the Search of the Aftermath of an Event

Christine Hansen
This exposition provides an example of how art can offer an alternative way of understanding the past through my work “50 Billion Micrograms”. The project explored a forgotten media event from 1979, in which a gigantic meteorite supposedly landed in a remote lake on the west coast of Norway. The exposition attempts to demonstrate how ambiguity was a fuel the project.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

Passages of Light: Analogue and Digital Moving Image Installation.

Alexander Nevill
Within a rapidly changing media landscape, light remains an intrinsic and potentially expressive aspect of moving imagery, regardless of the shape, form and resolution that specific capture and display devices might take. The practice of light in moving imagery is typically considered through an arrangement of sources, filters and modifiers that sculpt the aesthetic appearance of a two-dimensional frame and is often studied in relation to mainstream Hollywood films.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

What can a process do? A passage from ritual to rituality

Usoa Fullaondo
In this exposition I try to build new relationships between different creative processes arising from nature, life, and art. This is done by setting up visual, textual, and affective analogies through superimpositions of layers of images, sound, and text based on the book Un Atletismo Afectivo (An Affective Athleticism) (publication on paper, 116 pp, 2016) and the audiovisual work Trenza (Braid) (HD video, 55', 2017).
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

17

Since its inception in 2011, the Research Catalogue (RC) has been developed around ‘expositions,’ that is, digital objects unique to the RC for the authoring and publishing of practice as research. This journal, of course, has been heavily invested in the format of expositions from the onset, [1] inviting artists and authors to experiment with what is possible, and encouraging peer reviewers – and readers in general – to contemplate the prospect that the most exciting research may defy the criteria that bureaucracy has developed to assess [...]
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Building Material Conversations

Scott Andrew Elliott, Chris Cottrell
An expanded notion of conversation is developed through a series of large-scale temporary installations, and used to articulate an approach to collaborative creative practice that furthers the discourse of new materialist philosophy. These collaboratively produced installations are introduced into different spaces of a singular building in an iterative engagement sustained over a period of five years.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

FanFutures

Kate McCallum, Kate Monson, Majed Al-Jefri
"FanFutures" is a project working with artificial (AI) automatic text generation in an exploration of fan fiction and speculation about possible futures. It is a collaboration between an artist, a computer scientist, and a social scientist — and, in an extended sense, also with the fan fiction community and an AI algorithm.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

IN SITU: Sonic Greenhouse. Composing for the intersections between the sonic and the built

Otso Tapio Lähdeoja, Josué Moreno Prieto, Daniel Adrian Malpica Gomez
This exposition presents and discusses a large-scale audio-architectural installation entitled "IN SITU: Sonic Greenhouse," which took place at the Helsinki City Winter Garden — or Talvipuutarha — in September and October 2016. Structure-borne audio transducers were employed to drive sound into the glass structure of the greenhouse in order to create an immersive sound experience emanating from the materiality of the building, transforming the site into a macro-scale musical instrument.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

The Body + The Lens: Shrink, Wax, Purge, Bleach.

Tyler Payne
"The Body + the Lens: Shrink, Wax, Purge, Bleach" was a creative practice research project that investigated the relationship of (white) women’s embodiment to the lens of gendered advertising. To focus the research, a recently mainstreamed group of female cosmetic rituals were chosen — body-contour wear (SPANX), Brazilian waxing, salt-water cleansing, and fake tanning.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

16

Achieving quality in artistic research must be a key concern. In academia, quality is often assessed with regard to the content of a research project, e.g. how novel and substantiated findings are; how those findings are presented usually does not matter. In art, however, both form and content are crucial; hence, the notion of quality must apply to more aspects of a project and in particular to the relations between them.

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Responsive Aesthetics: Remediating Digital-to-Analog Television Converters as Artist Tools

Eric Souther, Laura McGough, Jason Bernagozzi
“Responsive Aesthetics: Remediating Digital-to-Analog Television Converters as Artist Tools” documents the research process undertaken to explore the reanimation of a digital-to-analog television converter box as an artistic tool for intervention with the digital broadcast image through real-time datamoshing.
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keywords: OPEN EXPOSITION

15

JAR is invested in the mediality and non-verbal articulation of artistic research. The journal’s creation was linked to the development of the Research Catalogue (RC) and with it came the possibility to publish media in ways not controlled by a preconceived layout or styling. Having worked with rich-media submissions of artistic research for a while, it has become clear that technology matters insofar as it enables certain modes of articulation, but that it will not determine how practice is exposed as research and what understanding is gained in the end.

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14

JAR has always been careful to invite ‘expositions of practice as research’ rather than just ‘expositions.’ The reason lies in one aspect of the term ‘exposition’, which suggests that ‘to expose’ is to explain something or make it public. While not incorrect, this reading is not sensitive enough to a central idea in JAR: that in the act of exposition, that which is seemingly exposed is also constituted.

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